• Personalized Preventative

    Genetic Services


GMCM primary goals are to eliminate disparities and enhance healthcare by providing genetic services for prevention of cancers and diseases and also personalizing patient’s medication. Committed to a continuous expansion of the network of physicians, GMCM offers physicians an opportunity to develop, enhance and support their patients.

Committed to scientific integrity, patient support services, patient advocacy, education and mentoring of experienced and inexperienced medical staff, GMCM’ purpose is to aid the planning, development, implementation and evaluation of standard of care for all patients receiving genetic services for personalized preventative care.

GMCM is located in a private practice in downtown Chicago, Illinois with over 30 years of combined experience in clinical research. GMCM is culturally competent and maintains the highest ethical standards with sensitivity to diverse social, religious and cultural beliefs. This has allowed GMCM to overcome the many challenges of diversified recruitment of patients and physicians.

The commitment to the development and maintenance of a healthy community has allowed GMCM to develop the Strategic Holistic Ongoing Partnership (SHOP) Program. This community outreach program identifies health needs and provides ongoing education, training and services to the healthcare professional as well as the community at large.

GMCM conducts evidence-based services that yield quality data/results, which ultimately provides the physician and any healthcare organization with a comprehensive service plan for their patients. GMCM embraces the importance of diversity in a clinical environment, while enhancing the quality of life for all populations who benefit from personalized preventative care.

Genetic Services

Personalized Medication Metabolism Assessment

A pharmacogenomics (PGx) test to help resolve the inefficiency that is evident in trial-and- error medicine. This test shows how individual genetic differences affect drug response, particularly through drug metabolism. The physician reviews the patient’s extensive report and decides to change medications or do nothing and at the same time, learns about how the patient metabolizes all medications for new and old prescriptions. A PharmD hotline is available for any questions or concerns patients and/or physicians may have.

Preventative Disease Screening

A carrier screening that analyzes 62 genes linked to 24 of the most prevalent and devastating hereditary diseases. It tests individuals who are at the reproductive stage in life (18-45 years old male or female) and gives the probability of one or more diseases on the panel getting passed down to their children. It also provides great information on their genetic makeup whether seeking to have children or not. It also provides great information on genetic makeup whether seeking to have children or not, if patient is adopted, or if you don’t know your family history.


Preventative Cancer Screening

Research has shown that up to 10 percent of cancers are due to factors that are passed from one generation to the next. These syndromes are known as hereditary cancers and this genetic test can be used to determine an individual’s risk for developing these cancers. It analyzes 31 genes linked to 8 different types of tumorous cancers and their risk factor based on a qualification criterion. Testing your patients will help them take control and reduce or even prevent the cancer from occurring.

Cardiovascular Disease Risk

A simple and non-invasive genetic test to detect mutations responsible for monogenic diseases of early atherosclerosis. Panel genes affects the plasma levels of lipids (total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides) and blood sugar. Targeted disease have a high impact on cardiovascular risk since they appear at an early age and indicate poor prognosis without aggressive medical intervention. The probability of identifying the responsible mutation in patients who meet clinical criteria of familial hypercholesterolemia ranges from 60% to 80%.

Cancer Screening

People at a higher risk for cancer may have the option of having more frequent cancer screenings, avoiding specific risk factors, making lifestyle changes to lessen additional risk, taking preventive medication (chemoprevention), and/or having risk reducing surgeries in order to reduce their risk. Cancer screening panel includes:

  • BREAST
  • OVARIAN
  • COLORECTAL
  • PANCREATIC
  • ENDOMETRIAL
  • GASTRIC
  • SKIN
  • PROSTATE
  • Hereditary breast cancer

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer, affecting approximately 1 in 8 women in the United States. Approximately 5-10% of breast cancers are hereditary. Hereditary cancers are caused by a mutation in a gene that can be passed on from generation to generation. Women who have an abnormal mutation can have up to an 87% risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetimes.

    Factors that may increase your risk of Breast cancer include:
    • Family history of breast cancer
    • Genetic Mutations
    • Dense breast tissue
    • Early onset of menstrual periods or late menopause
    • History of radiation to the chest area
    • Not having children or having them later in life
    • Postmenopausal hormone therapy
    • Increased Age, Alcohol, Obesity

    How to reduce risk of Breast cancer:
    • Frequent Breast Cancer screenings
    • Preventative medications
    • Drink alcohol in moderation, if at all
    • Exercise most days of the week
    • Limit postmenopausal hormone therapy
    • Maintain a healthy weight
    • Risk reducing surgery

  • Hereditary Ovarian Cancer

    Ovarian cancer is the ninth most common cancer in women, but it ranks fifth as the cause of cancer death in women. While most ovarian cancer does not run in the family, approximately 10-15% of ovarian cancer is hereditary. Hereditary cancers are caused by a mutation in a gene that can be passed on from generation to generation. Women who have an abnormal can have up to a 44% risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetimes.

    Factors that may increase your risk of Ovarian cancer include:
    • Family history of breast cancer
    • Genetic Mutations
    • A previous cancer diagnosis
    • Increasing age
    • Never having been pregnant

    How to reduce risk of Ovarian cancer:
    • Consider taking Birth Control Pills
    • Preventative Surgery

  • Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    Colorectal cancer is cancer that starts in either the colon or the rectum. Most colorectal cancer does not run in the family, but approximately 5% of colorectal cancer is hereditary. Hereditary cancers are caused by a mutation in a gene that can be passed on from generation to generation.

    Factors that may increase your risk of Colon cancer include:
    • Family history of colon cancer
    • Genetic mutations
    • History of colon polyps, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and other diseases
    • Older age (>50), African-American race
    • Low-fiber, high-fat diet.
    • Diabetes, Obesity, Smoking, Alcohol Consumption

    How to reduce risk of Colon cancer:
    • People with an average risk of colon cancer can consider screening beginning at age 50
    • People with an increased risk, such as those with a family history of colon cancer, should consider screening sooner. African-Americans and American Indians may consider beginning colon cancer screening at age 45
    • Eat a variety of fruits, vegetables and whole grains, drink alcohol in moderation, if at all
    • Stop smoking
    • Exercise most days of the week, Maintain a healthy weight
    • Various Medications
    • Risk reducing surgery

  • Hereditary Pancreatic Cancer

    Approximately 1 in 76 people will develop pancreatic cancer in their lifetime. Most pancreatic cancer develops by chance and does not run in families. However, some pancreatic cancers are hereditary. Hereditary cancers are caused by a mutation in a gene that can be passed on from generation to generation and cause up to 10% of Pancreatic Cancers

    Factors that may increase your risk of pancreatic cancer include:
    • Personal or family history of pancreatic cancer
    • Genetic Mutations
    • Smoking
    • Excess body weight
    • Chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis)
    • Diabetes
    • African-American race

    How to reduce risk of Pancreatic cancer:
    • Stop smoking
    • Maintain a Healthy Weight
    • Choose a Healthy Diet

  • Hereditary Endometrial Cancer

    Endometrial cancer (cancer of the lining of the uterus) is the most common cancer of the female reproductive organs. Approximately 1 in 41 women will develop endometrial cancer. While most endometrial cancer does not run in the family, 1-5% of endometrial cancer is hereditary.

    Factors that may increase your risk of Endometrial cancer include:
    • Family history of uterine or colon cancer
    • Genetic mutations
    • Increasing age
    • Obesity
    • Diabetes
    • Changes in the balance of female hormones in the body
    • Starting menstruation at an early age — before age 12 — or beginning menopause later increases the risk of endometrial cancer
    • Never having been pregnant
    • Hormone Therapy

    How to reduce risk of Endometrial cancer:
    • Talk to your doctor about the risks of hormone therapy after menopause
    • Consider taking birth control pills
    • Maintain a healthy weight
    • Exercise most days of the week.

  • Hereditary Gastric Cancer

    Gastric cancer (also called stomach cancer) is cancer that starts in the stomach. Most stomach cancers do not run in the family, but some stomach cancers are hereditary and gene abnormalities can significantly increase the risk of one or more types of gastric cancers.

    Factors that may increase your risk of Gastric cancer include:
    • Family history of stomach cancer
    • Genetic Mutations
    • A diet high in salty and smoked foods and low in fruits and vegetables
    • Infection with Helicobacter pylori
    • Long-term stomach inflammation
    • Smoking
    • Stomach polyps

    How to reduce risk of Gastric cancer:
    • Choose a healthy diet full of fruits and vegetables and reduce amount of salty and smokey foods
    • Exercise most days of the week and maintain a healthy weight
    • Certain Medications
    • Increased Screenings
    • Stop Smoking

  • Hereditary Skin Cancer

    Skin cancer is often divided into two categories: non-melanoma and melanoma. Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common cancers in men and women. There are two types of non-melanoma skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

    Factors that may increase your risk of Skin cancer include:
    • Family history of skin cancer
    • Genetic mutations
    • Exposure to sunlight/UV radiation
    • Fair skin, Moles, Skin lesions
    • History of sunburns or fragile skin

    How to reduce risk of Skin cancer:
    • Avoid the sun during the middle of the day
    • Wear sunscreen year-round and protective clothing
    • Avoid tanning beds
    • Be aware of sun-sensitizing medications
    • Vigilant screening

  • Hereditary Prostate Cancer

    Other than skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer found in American men. Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death in men. Most cases of prostate cancer develop by chance and do not run in families. However, a portion of prostate cancers are hereditary. Hereditary cancers are caused by a mutation in a gene that can be passed on from generation to generation. Men who have an abnormal gene are as much as 20 times more likely to develop prostate cancer.

    Factors that may increase your risk of Prostate cancer include:
    • Family history of prostate cancer
    • Genetic Mutations
    • Older Age (>65), African American Race, Obesity

    How to reduce risk of Prostate cancer:
    • Choose a healthy diet full of fruits and vegetables
    • Exercise most days of the week. Exercise improves your overall health, helps you
    • Maintain a healthy weight
    • Certain Medications
    • Increased Screenings

GreenMCMeds Tests Select the disease to get more detailed information and then click on the specific condition

Suggested Step-by-Step Process to Incorporate Testing Services in YOUR Office:

Performing the following steps during patient initial intake will be the most efficient. The total time required is approximately 3-5 minutes from start to finish.

  • Office staff pre-screens and identifies qualified patients for the day.
  • Appointed trained staff within the clinic explains the test and obtains Informed Consent and fills out the Requisition Form then swab patient’s mouth for a sample.
  • Make a copy of patient’s ID and Insurance Card front and back prior to shipping sample.
  • Collect all samples and ship per protocol with provided prepaid shipping packaging and label information that is included in the packet (contains requisition/consent form, swab, shipping package and label).

All materials for the swabs/mouth rinses are provided including marketing material and prepaid shipping packaging. There is absolutely NO start up cost to the physician or any cost to continue providing these services.

These test improve clinical judgment and help physicians form a more accurate, comprehensive and effective treatment regimen with the goal of enhancing a patient’s quality of life.

Frequently Asked Questions

A. A positive test result means that the patient has the mutation and is at higher risk than the average patient for particular gene. It does not guarantee the patient will inherit the disease or will in fact get cancer.

A. A negative test result means that the patient doesn’t have a particular mutation that will affect the patient. It doesn’t mean you will not get the cancer/disease, it just means IF you do, it was not genetically related and was caused by environmental or social reasons.

A. The patient is pre-screened and goes through a prior authorization with the patient’s insurance to identify if the patient qualifies for 100% coverage. If the patient has any financial responsibility towards their test sample, they are contacted directly to offer financial payment options or can opt out at anytime prior to the laboratory running the sample to prevent getting billed.

A. There are absolutely no start up costs for a physician, clinic or organization to offer these services to their patients. GreenMCMeds provides all kits, marketing material and pre-paid shipping packaging labels to mail samples to our testing laboratory.

A. Depending on the clinics supporting staff, either the physician, or the appointed staff will identify qualified patients for the day based on family history, and/or insurance coverage from a provided accepted insurance list for that specific test. Upon a successful candidate list for the screening assessment service, explain the service being offered to the patient during the encounter, gather patient/physician signatures (Requisition/Consent Forms), make/print copy of patient’s insurance and perform the mouth swab/rinse on patient.

  • The physicians reviews the patients report and decides to change/adjust the medications or do nothing but at the same time learns about how the patient metabolizes all medications for new and old prescriptions.
  • The patient now has options to be able to change their lifestyle to reduce risk of getting cancer/disease.
  • The patient will know how often to check/screen to see if a cancer/disease is developing.
  • The patient may have an option to be able to take medicine to prevent the disease (chemoprevention therapy).

DISCLAIMER: GreenMCMeds does not partake in cultivation or dispensing of cannabis in no way, shape, or form, nor are we affiliated with any dispensaries or cultivation sites.

GreenMCM

“Your Health, Our Passion!”

Our Inspiration

Our Inspiration

Mon Chéri inspired us in her battle with brain cancer. Her fight helped us think differently about disease, prescription drugs and how knowledge is the key to prevention and treatment.

Contacts

   info@greenmcm.com

   (312) 838-2400

   233 East Erie Street, Suite #506
         Chicago, Illinois 60611

Sign Up Now TOP